How to Clean a Futon Mattress of Cat Pee

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It never matters how hard you try to “pet proof” your furniture. If you have pets – especially independent pets like cats – the odds are pretty good, that you’re going to have at least a handful of accidents to deal with every now and again.

Unfortunately because of the way that futons are made, cleaning cat pee is never quite as simple or straightforward as simply zipping the cover off, tossing it in the washing machine and calling it a day.

Most people never put a secondary futon cover on this piece of furniture to begin with. That’s probably a good idea after the first time you have to go through the steps below to fix the problem. That said, cat’s pee can be super potent and pungent, so it will always be a bit of a challenge to deal with.

But that’s why we have put together this detailed guide!

Armed with the inside information below you’re going to know how to remedy this problem ASAP, eliminating it completely (and any unpleasant residue smells, too) without headache or hassle.

Let’s get right into it.

The first piece of the puzzle is to properly diagnose the stain and the smells you’re dealing with.

Sometimes we think we are dealing with a pet accident when we are really dealing with a bit of lemonade or some other kind of stain that looks similar from a distance but doesn’t smell like cat urine at all.

Thankfully, it really isn’t going to be tough for you to diagnose this problem.

Cat urine smells like ammonia but even worse (if that’s possible), making it immediately recognizable to anyone that’s ever used in ammonia-based cleaner. You’re going to know it the second that you get your nose near that kind of stain – and then you’ll know exactly how to best move forward with the inside information below.

Choose Your Cleaner Combo Approach

Below we highlight two different cleaner combinations that you’ll be able to use to effectively get rid of cat urine from your futon once and for all.

Both of these combinations work very well on their own and shouldn’t be combined with one another. Depending on the supplies you have on hand you might go in one direction or the other, and both can be tried out separately on stains to see which one works best for your particular futon fabric as well.

Baking Soda and Vinegar

This approach is going to have you first blot the stain itself with paper towels, pulling up as much of the still wet urine as possible and removing it from the surface.

You might think that the urine has been there long enough not to have any wet stuff left behind, but you might be surprised at how long this urine can sit on the surface of your futon before it works its way in and dries completely.

The next thing you’ll want to do is to add a little bit of white vinegar to a spray bottle and gently mist the impacted area. You don’t want to soak things completely through but you want to get pretty decent coverage, striking a happy medium between those two extremes.

Then you’ll want to let the vinegar sit for anywhere between 30 seconds and 60 seconds, allowing it to sort of work its magic.

The step after this is to grab a cotton towel or a bunch of paper towels and start to blot the vinegar itself up. Remove as much as you can without going crazy.

The last piece of this puzzle is sprinkling a bit of baking soda all over the area and allowing it to cake up. Leave everything overnight, giving it a try to mix and mingle, and in the morning you want to go over the area with a vacuum brush.

You’ll lift everything up (including the cat urine) and will neutralize all negative smells at the same time. You might need to add a bit of air freshener to the area to kill off any latent vinegar smells, but other than that you’ll be good to go.

Baking Soda, Peroxide, and Dish Soap

If you want to take a different approach (and don’t want to use vinegar because of the way that it smells) you’ll want to make a concoction of 16 ounces of hydrogen peroxide, a single tablespoon of dishwashing liquid, and a single tablespoon of baking soda – all mixed together completely in a spray bottle.

Shake things up a little bit to ensure complete distribution and then saturate the urine soaked area. Let everything dry completely – usually overnight – and then go over the area with a vacuum the same way that we recommended above.

Wipe the area down with a damp cloth afterwards to remove any residue and you should be good to go.

Call In The Professionals

If neither of those options work as well as you’d hoped, or you continue to have these kinds of accidents happen and need “bigger guns” to knock this problem out once and for all, it’s not a bad idea to call in the professionals and have drycleaners take care of your futon for you.

This is (obviously) going to be a much more expensive way to get rid of cat urine smells and stains but it’s also going to result in a deeply cleaned, almost totally sanitized, and wonderfully smelling futon that would have been next to impossible to pull off otherwise.

Not every drycleaner is going to have the ability to handle your futon mattress, though – especially if you do not have a futon cover that can be easily removed and taken care of.

It’s not a bad idea to call around just to double confirm that your futon can be cleaned by the Dry Cleaner you have in mind. There let you know if they can help. If they can’t they’ll usually point you in the direction of someone that can, too.

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